Human Journalism – best articles from periodismohumano.com

By Mónica G. Prieto (Homs, Syria)

Translation: Blanca G. Bertolaza

  • Fifth chapter of the “Syrian Chronicles”, written this Christmas in the besieged city of Homs, in Syria.
  • Standing on top of a platform, Mohamed al Dalaub, 23 year old construction worker, begins to sing a song. Men, women and children are his choir and start dancing as if it were a party. Except that this party, like in all of Syria, can end drenched in blood.
  • “When freedom knocks on your door, fear disappears”. That is Al Dalaub’s explanation for the continuation of the protests.

The Baba Amr singers during a protest in Homs. (Mónica G. Prieto/Periodismo Humano)

Standing on top of a platform, Mohamed al Dalaub, 23 year old construction worker, starts a songs that the hundreds who almost daily attend the demonstrations in the Baba Amr neighborhood of Homs have already learnt by heart. “Come on, Bashar, what you are doing is wrong. Leave and leave Syria alone”. Men, women and children are his choir, dancing to the rhythm of the drum played by Mohamed Darmush, 23 year old painter, and start dancing as if they were attending a party. Except that this party, like in all the rest of Syria, can end up drenched in blood because the Security Forces, for the last nine months, have been trying to silence the cries that demand freedom with their weapons.

Young women at a protest in Baba Amr, Homs. December 2011. (Mónica G. Prieto/Periodismo Humano)

Protests in Homs begin with songs and usually end with shots. Each neighborhood in this city, which has been under siege for five months, holds rallies against the regime every night. They are not as marked by improvisation as in the beginning, and the main example is that each one has its own revolutionary singer-songwriter, such as Al Dalaub or Zakiah Ahmad, a 22 year old construction worker who spend their days writing and rehearsing in a humble home with Darmoush the songs they will sing by night. Leer más